CLIP CLOP, CLIP CLOP

by Donald Conway

Prose


Tonight's Patrol

by Justin Stone

Prose


Life Was Simpler When I Carried a Duffel Bag

by George Kulas

Prose


Requiem for a Tet Survivor

by La Decker

Prose


I've Lost My Mind

by Melvin Brinkley

Poem,Songs Lyrics


A Painting Still

by Dean Glorso

Poem


Thank You America

By david staffa, Army

Writing Type: Prose

By David Staffa

 

Working, living and fighting in a combat zone can change a soldier’s mind and perspective on many issues. Herewith are some of a soldier’s amended perspectives and what he learned: 

 

Thank you, America, for allowing me to fly to a combat zone. It was exhausting; it took us three days to fly from Florida to Afghanistan due to flight delays.

 

Thank you, America. I was able to provide some food and comfortable blankets to many Afghan families that lived in mud and straw homes and cooked food with wood as well as heating their home with wood. I am not talking about wood furnaces but stone home-built fire pits for cooking and heating.

 

Thank you, America. I learned that Muslins are good people; it is the terrorists that give the religion a bad name.

 

Thank you, America. I learned that you can still have some sense of humor in a combat zone.

 

Thank you, America. I am grateful that my military pay was tax free while deployed. It really helped.

 

Thank you, America. My battle buddy and I were able to procure school supplies and backpacks for some of the Afghan kids and personally hand them out to them.

 

Thank you, America. The Department of Veterans Affairs is taking care of my medical and personal injury issues. 

 

Thank you, America. I learned that what we were doing in Afghanistan was a complete waste of people and money. Just re-read what I just said, America.

 

Thank you, America. There are some gems of individuals, both military and civilian, who truly make living in a combat zone easier. They cut through the red tape and stupid mentality and get the job done, sometimes with no one knowing what they are doing to do so.

 

Thank you, America. I learned that we should have invaded Pakistan and not stay in Afghanistan – Pakistan is where the terrorists are based.

 

Thank you, America. Because of my disabilities, I have to rely on the VA for disability compensation. I am truly sorry that I have to do this, but I can’t work anymore.

 

Thank you, America.  Deploying to Afghanistan was an experience of a lifetime, and I would do it again.

 

Thank you, America. I have lifetime memories of many good men – among the military two, Steve and Mike, and a civilian named Bob. All three were solid, good people who gave their shirt off their backs to help others.

 

Thank you, America. I learned to ignore opinion and honor knowledge.

 

I deployed to Afghanistan at age 56. Thank you, America.

 

Zipline

by donna zephrine

Prose


Hanging Tough Is Tough

by George Kulas

Prose


Thank You America

by david staffa

Prose


Requiem for a Tet Survivor

by La Decker

Prose


Early Jade of Morning

by Frank Mattson

Poem


Too Late

by Tony Craidon

Poem